CIDRAL/MFTN Theory Intensive on Queer Theory with J. Jack Halberstam: Weds 11 March 2015, 10am – 12 noon

CIDRAL Theory Intensive on Queer Theory with J. Jack Halberstam (USC)

Wednesday 11 March 2015, 10am- 12 noon

Anthony Burgess Foundation

Engine House Chorlton Mill 3, Cambridge Street, Manchester

Speakers: Professor J. Jack Halberstam (USC), Professor Monica Pearl (EAC, Manchester) and Clara Bradbury-Rance (PhD student, EAC, Manchester)

This event is organised by Manchester Feminist Theory Network (MFTN) and CIDRAL, and sponsored by the North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership (NWCDTP).

The event is free to attend, but all attendees must register at the Eventbrite page: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/cidral-mftn-theory-intensive-on-queer-theory-with-j-jack-halberstam-registration-14992273293

Readings are available to download from the CIDRAL website: http://events.manchester.ac.uk/event/event:w2i-i0ji16um-et96oa

Sexuality Summer School, 18 May – 22 May 2015: Queer Arts as Activism

Sexuality Summer School: 18-22 May 2015

Queer Arts as Activism

The Sexuality Summer School 2015 will bring to Manchester an extraordinary line-up of scholars, artists, performers, filmmakers and writers. Our public events programme will include:

Opening Lecture: Gavin Butt (Professor of Visual Cultures & Performance, Goldsmiths)

Roundtable with filmmaker John Greyson (Associate Professor in Film, York, CA) in conversation with Richard Dyer (Professor of Film Studies, Kings) and Lisa Henderson (Professor in Communication Studies, UMass Amherst)

Lecture and screenings with writer and filmmaker Sarah Schulman (Distinguished Professor in English, CSI CUNY)

 Performance lecture by photographer and artist Del LaGrace Volcano

These public events accompany the Sexuality Summer School, a five-day event for postgraduates, organized by the Centre for the Study of Sexuality and Culture (CSSC) at the University of Manchester since 2008 and funded by the University of Manchester Faculty of Humanities, Manchester Pride and Screen. The Sexuality Summer School brings  postgraduates, researchers and international scholars together with artists and filmmakers to facilitate dialogue and discussions that speak to contemporary debates in queer and feminist sexuality studies, with a particular emphasis on the interdisciplinary study of culture.

The Sexuality Summer School will also include workshops for students with Jackie Kay, Nina Wakeford (Goldsmiths), and members of CSSC at the University of Manchester, including: Jackie Stacey, Monica Pearl, Laura Doan, Daniela Caselli and Kaye Mitchell.

All public events are open to everyone. The public lectures are free and tickets for screenings and performances will be purchasable online through the venues (our website will be updated with all details of times and locations). Registration for the Sexuality Summer School is open to all PhD and Masters students and will go live on 2 March 2015 at estore.manchester.ac.uk. The number of students is limited to 30 so book early to avoid disappointment. Price: £80 (early bird, until 13 March) / £95 (regular). Includes entry to ticketed events.

For more information about the Sexuality Summer School, including details of previous events, visit sexualitysummerschool.wordpress.com, email sexualitysummerschool@gmail.com to get on the mailing list, Facebook Sexuality Summer School or tweet @SSS_Manchester.

Seminar, Monday 17 November 2014: Shaka McGlotten, ‘The Political Aesthetics of Drag’

Shaka Poster Final

‘Political Aesthetics of Drag’

Shaka McGlotten (SUNY)

Monday 17 November 2014, 5.15pm-7pm, Room G16, Martin Harris Centre, University of Manchester

The Centre for the Study of Sexuality and Culture (CSSC, University of Manchester) with the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology

Drag can be a means of touching queer and other publics, or of mediating one’s economic precarity. It can function as art by other means, or by any means necessary. And like politics, drag can be a duty, a contentious pleasure, or something to dread. In the talk, I present drag aesthetics as an ethics, focusing specifically on the ways artists and activists use drag to respond to, or reframe, some of the pressing political crises of our times, including racism, austerity, and police and military violence, among others. The project is constructed as a series of interlocking ethnographic portraits of contemporary drag across three sites, New York City, Berlin, and Israel/Palestine. These stories foreground some of my interlocutors’ competing desires for doing drag—for some it provides a stage from which they can articulate a radical politics, while for others it is a sensual refuge away from politics as they are ordinarily understood. I thereby seek to show how the desires that animate the drag personas and performances of my informants reflect a diverse array of lived conditions and political aesthetic orientations.

Shaka McGlotten, currently living and working in Berlin as a Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, is Associate Professor of Media, Society and Arts at Purchase College-SUNY, where he teaches courses on ethnography, digital culture and queer studies. He is co-editor of Black Genders and Sexualities (Palgrave, 2012) and Zombie Sexuality: Essays on Sex and the Living Dead (McFarland, 2014). He has written and spoken widely about public sex, virtual worlds, gaming, and hook up aps, preoccupations that appear in his monograph, Virtual Intimacies: Media, Affect, and Queer Sociality (SUNY Press, 2013).

Today, Thursday 16 October: ‘Differently Queer: Sexuality and Aesthetics in Pier Paolo Pasolini and Elsa Morante’

Manuele Gragnolati (Oxford)
16 October 2014 4pm – 7pm
University Place 3.211, University of Manchester
This paper explores the analogies and differences in the aesthetics of the late works by Pier Paolo Pasolini and Elsa Morante. Both authors mobilise a contorted, inverted, and suspended temporality that resists linearity and teleology and, instead, allows for the articulation of paradoxical pleasures that cannot be inscribed in a normative logics of development, conversion, or productivity. In this sense the late aesthetics of Pasolini and Morante replicates a queer form of sexuality, but while in the case of Pasolini it enacts self-shattering and oblivion, it embraces inversion, fluidity, and memory in the case of Morante.
 

Monday 17 Nov 2014, 5.15pm-7pm: Shaka McGlotten, ‘Political Aesthetics of Drag’

‘Political Aesthetics of Drag’

Shaka McGlotten (SUNY)

Monday 17 November 2014, 5.15pm-7pm, Room G16, Martin Harris Centre, University of Manchester

The Centre for the Study of Sexuality and Culture (CSSC, University of Manchester) with the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology

Drag can be a means of touching queer and other publics, or of mediating one’s economic precarity. It can function as art by other means, or by any means necessary. And like politics, drag can be a duty, a contentious pleasure, or something to dread. In the talk, I present drag aesthetics as an ethics, focusing specifically on the ways artists and activists use drag to respond to, or reframe, some of the pressing political crises of our times, including racism, austerity, and police and military violence, among others. The project is constructed as a series of interlocking ethnographic portraits of contemporary drag across three sites, New York City, Berlin, and Israel/Palestine. These stories foreground some of my interlocutors’ competing desires for doing drag—for some it provides a stage from which they can articulate a radical politics, while for others it is a sensual refuge away from politics as they are ordinarily understood. I thereby seek to show how the desires that animate the drag personas and performances of my informants reflect a diverse array of lived conditions and political aesthetic orientations.

Shaka McGlotten, currently living and working in Berlin as a Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, is Associate Professor of Media, Society and Arts at Purchase College-SUNY, where he teaches courses on ethnography, digital culture and queer studies. He is co-editor of Black Genders and Sexualities (Palgrave, 2012) and Zombie Sexuality: Essays on Sex and the Living Dead (McFarland, 2014). He has written and spoken widely about public sex, virtual worlds, gaming, and hook up aps, preoccupations that appear in his monograph, Virtual Intimacies: Media, Affect, and Queer Sociality (SUNY Press, 2013).

Thurs 16 October 2014, 4pm-7pm: ‘Differently Queer: Sexuality and Aesthetics in Pier Paolo Pasolini and Elsa Morante’

‘Differently Queer: Sexuality and Aesthetics in Pier Paolo Pasolini and Elsa Morante’

Research Seminar with Professor Manuele Gragnolati (Somerville College, Oxford) 

4pm-7pm, Thursday 16 October 2014, University of Manchester, University Place 3.211

(organised by Dr Francesca Billiani, Italian)

This paper explores the analogies and differences in the aesthetics of the late works by Pier Paolo Pasolini and Elsa Morante. Both authors mobilize a contorted, inverted, and suspended temporality that resists linearity and teleology and, instead, allows for the articulation of paradoxical pleasures that cannot be inscribed in a normative logics of development, conversion, or productivity. In this sense the late aesthetics of Pasolini and Morante replicates a queer form of sexuality, but while in the case of Pasolini it enacts self-shattering and oblivion, it embraces inversion, fluidity, and memory in the case of Morante.
The paper will be followed by a discussion of the reading (see below), as well as Professor Gragnolati’s new book, Amor che move. Linguaggio del corpo e forma del desiderio in Dante, Pasolini e Morante (Milan: il Saggiatore, 2013).  The event will close with a wine reception at Kro bar from 7pm.

Readings:

Gragnolati, Manuele, ‘Analogy and Difference: Multistable Figures in Pasolini’s Appunti per un’Orestiade Africana’, in The Scandal of Self-Contradiction: Pasolini’s Multistable Subjectivities, Geographies, Traditions, ed. by Luca di Blasi, Manuele Gragnolati, and Christoph F. E. Holzhey (Berlin: Verlag Turia & Kant, 2012), pp. 119-134

Available here:https://www.dropbox.com/s/gpqcb5vroclm827/Gragnolati_analogy_difference-libre.pdf?dl=0

The event is supported by the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in the Arts and Languages (CIDRAL), The University of Manchester. For more on this seminar, please visit here.